Stroke In Children

Stroke in infants and children presents unique challenges to parents, caregivers and researchers.

Pediatric Stroke

Finding the cause of a stroke is vital to provid­ing the right treatment and preventing more injury. Doctors can find a cause in about two-thirds of the cases.

A common cause of ischemic strokes is that a blood clot forms in the heart and travels to the brain. This can be caused by congenital heart problems such as abnormal valves or infections. In these cases children may need surgery or antibiotics.

Sickle cell disease is a blood disorder that’s associated with ischemic stroke. In sickle cell disease, the blood cell can’t carry oxygen to the brain, and blood vessels leading to the brain may have narrowed or closed. About 10 percent of children with sickle cell disease suffer a stroke1. There is a high risk of repeat strokes, but this can be reduced by blood transfusion.

Finally, ischemic strokes can be caused by trauma that injures large arteries and causes a loss of blood flow. For instance, a large artery might be injured when a child has a neck injury.

1 Cooperative Study of Sickle Cell Disease

New Pediatric Stroke Resources


Thanks to the International Alliance for Pediatric Stroke's hard work and dedication, we are excited to share new pediatric stroke resources. Help us spread pediatric stroke awareness with these new tools: 


Find and Give Support

Visit our Support Network today

When faced with challenges recovering after heart disease or stroke, it’s important to have emotional support. That is why we created a network to connect patients and loved ones with others during their journey. 

Psychological Issues after Pediatric Stroke: What to Expect

The mental and emotional impact of a child having a stroke effects everyone who loves them. How cognition and behavior have changed tend to be discovered over time. Learn what to expect immediately after diagnosis and beyond.